Monday, September 25, 2006

Neighborhood Dispute

Aren't adults wonderful??
THIS IS CLASSIC!

Here's the story. A city councilman, Mark Easton, lives in this neighborhood. He had a beautiful view of the east mountains, until a new neighbor purchased the lot below his house and built.

Apparently, the new home was 18 inches higher than the ordinances would allow, so Mark Easton, mad about his lost view, went to the city to make sure they enforced the lower roof line ordinance. Mark and his new neighbor had some great arguments about this as you can imagine great feelings. The new neighbor had to drop the roof line - no doubt at great expense.

Recently, Mark Easton called the city and informed them that his new neighbor had installed some vents on the side of his home. Mark didn't like the look of these vents and asked the city to investigate. When they went to Mark's home to see the vent view, this is what they found...
(see following pictures).

7 comments:

jellyhead said...

That is brilliant!! It took me a few seconds to realise what I was looking at!

I hope the disgruntled neighbour feels much better after the 'vent installation'!

Motherkitty said...

Now that's what I call venting. (BTW, I didn't know they had mountains in FL.)

Motherkitty said...

So, what happened after the city investigated?

TUFFENUF said...

I don't know what the outcome was when the city investigated, but I don't see a crime here, just a statement!

Abandoned in Pasadena said...

Well the neighbor should have bought the empty lot himself if he wanted to keep his view. I hope the city lets him keep his new vents...I don't see why not...it's all in the way it's interpreted...I see it as an ART form.

We're all interested in seeing how this comes out...keep us informed.

Kerri said...

This is priceless! The neighbor chose a very clever way to 'vent' his feelings :)

Joann said...

A dispute between two neighbors over extravagant Christmas decorations gained Monte Sereno attention in national news. Alan and Bonnie Aerts of Monte Sereno, the City's most active philanthropists, had for years showcased elaborate holiday displays, costing as much as $150,000, on their front yard. The displays attracted large masses of visitors, resulting in great traffic around the normally quiet cul-de-sac of four houses. Neighbors Le and Susan Nguyen protested, and, in late 2003, the city council (with Councilmembers Barbara Nesbet, Mark Brodsky and Curtis Wright voting for and Councilmembers Erin Garner and David Baxter voting against) passed an ordinance regarding "regulation of special events" Which would require permits for such displays. This ordinance has also been called the "Alan Aerts" ordinance because no application for a special event has ever been submitted other than by the Aertses. The next Christmas (in 2004), the Aertses declined to apply for a permit, which would only allow the Aerts's holiday display to be active for 12 hours in a 72-hour period. Instead, they erected a huge, 10-foot-tall Grinch on their lawn, who swayed from side while singing "You're a mean one, Mr. Grinch" . The Grinch's outsretched arm pointed conspicuously at the home of the Nguyens.